Team

Mark C. Stone

PhD, PE, D.WRE

University Profile

Email: stone@unm.edu

Phone Number: +1-505-277-0115

Director, UNM Resilience Institute,

Associate Professor and Regents’ Lecturer, Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering

Dr. Stone’s research program is focused on the interface of natural and social systems. His current and recent research has included studies of headwater watersheds and headwater dependent communities, impacts of hydropower operations on downstream ecosystems and communities, and resilience of wildfire-impacted watersheds and associate communities. Dr. Stone has directed dozens of field, laboratory, and computational research projects throughout the Southwestern United States and in Latin America, Asia, and the Middle-East. He is a recipient of a prestigious NSF CAREER grant and he was winner of the 2019 School of Engineering Teaching Excellence Award.

Asa B. Stone

Independent Researcher

Dr. Stone holds her PhD. in Experimental Psychology (major) and Political Science (minor) from Washington State University, and her research focuses on human resilience to climate change.  Also as an Advanced Cicerone®, she currently investigates impacts of climate change on beer, social identity, and cultural heritage.

Ryan Webb

Research Assistant Professor

University Profile
Personal website

Email: rwebb@unm.edu

Phone Number: 505 277-2722

My interests are mountain hydrology and representing the snowpack as layered porous media as it relates to hydrological processes. This research involves fluid mechanics, unsaturated physics of complex porous media, thermodynamics, and vadose zone hydrology. I have conducted investigations using combined approaches of in situ field observations, remote sensing, numerical modeling, geophysics, and applied tracer experiments. Additional interests include watershed and hillslope hydrology, hydrologic impacts of land cover changes, remote sensing of the environment, and water resources in developing countries.

Students Involved

Dora Bean

Undergrad Student

Email: beand@unm.edu

Phone Number: 505 277-2722

student at the University of New Mexico. She is interested in the intersection of water management, climate change, and food security in small-scale agricultural communities in Latin America. For the last two years, she has assisted research projects which study agricultural issues in the Northern Andes of Ecuador. In her free time she likes to hike and avoid cleaning her messy house.

Smirti Chaulagain

Ph.D. Student and research assistant.

Email: schaulagain@unm.edu

Phone Number:505 277-2711

Riparian vegetation characteristics

I did my undergraduate in Civil Engineering from Kathmandu University, Nepal (my home country). I completed my Master of Science in Civil Engineering, majoring on Hydraulics and Water Resources from UNM. Before coming to UNM, I had an experience on pre-feasibility study of small hydropower project in Nepal. I am interested in modeling of natural system to understand the state and the possible solution for betterment of the system and mankind. I will explore on utility of remote sensing approach in hydraulics world. Beside this, I enjoy exploring new places, drawing, hiking and more other things.

Paulina Lima Guamán

PhD student

Email: paulinalima@unm.edu

Phone Number : +593 (0) 995-739-186

Paulina Lima is a Professor of Hydraulic Structures at the Central University of Ecuador (UCE) with research interest about understanding runoff sources in headwater streams and implications for hydropower projects using stable isotope analyses. She earned her BS in civil engineering from the UCE, an MS from the National Polytechnic School of Ecuador, an MS from the University of Liege in Belgium, and currently she is a fourth year PhD student at University of New Mexico. In Ecuador, Paulina has been working on the construction and design of water management projects. She has been working on hydraulic design and simulation programs using a 3D computational fluid dynamic model (CFD) ANSYS to simulate water bottom intake structures, using 2DH model SISBAHIA to simulate Ecuadorian tsunami events, and now she is working on understanding runoff sources in two watersheds that drain Manduriacu and Coca Codo Sinclair projects in Ecuador and the Chama Basin in New Mexico. Her PhD. studies and research are part of a collaborative program between the UCE and the UNM.

Aubrey Harris

PE, MSCE, PhD Student

Email: aeharris@unm.edu

My interests are in river engineering, including habitat restoration construction, reach-wide planning and hydraulic modelling. I have been working the Middle Rio Grande as a hydraulic/hydrologic engineer since 2015. I received my Master’s in Civil Engineering at West Virginia University, with my theses focused on in-situ water quality monitoring for emergency spill response. I participated in AmeriCorps VISTA in Kingwood, WV for the Friends of the Cheat (Watershed) as a community coordinator in 2012, following completion of my Bachelors in Biological and Agricultural Engineering at Texas A&M University. I’m originally from Houston, TX. I love the outdoors. My hobbies include running and triathlons, hiking, and gardening

Mo Hobbs

Email: mohobbs@unm.edu

Phone Number: 505 277-3411

I am a graduate student in the Water Resources Program with a concentration in hydroscience. I received my undergrad in Zoology from the University of Wyoming. I am interested in utilizing biological organisms to monitor and assess the results of hydraulic engineering.  I’m currently using macroinvertebrates to assess conditions in the Rio Chama, but don’t let that “bug” you!

Lauren Jaramillo

Ph.D Student

Email: alwayslo@unm.edu

Phone number: 505 277-2722

I am pursing a Ph.D. in Engineering, Hydraulics and Water Resources Engineering at the University of New Mexico. I have a M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering, Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology from Stanford and a B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of New Mexico. My research focus is on implementations of resilience engineering for natural disturbances. Some of my work includes understanding the impacts of forest management and wildfires on watershed recovery, assessing general water resource vulnerabilities for socio-hydrological systems, and building resilience for socio-hydrological systems. My research has the potential to help management decisions which could positively influence the region by protecting human health and securing water resources. As a native of the Southwest and the daughter of a rancher, I have always had a passion and understanding of the importance of water, especially in the Western US.

Claudia Jimenez Arellano

Undergrad and master’s student

Email: cjimenezarellano@unm.edu

Phone Number: 505 277-2722

My name is Claudia Jimenez Arellano, and I am a Senior in the Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering. I am currently enrolled in the Shared Credit program and will soon start doing research. I am interested in Water Resources Engineering and would love to get a Ph.D. in the future. I am also a certified Remote PIC, and I am excited to start using drones to help on other people’s research and eventually my own.

Michaela Jones

Master’s student, research assistant

Email: mijones@unm.edu

After graduating with a B.S. in Sustainability from Arizona State, I started working toward an M.S. in Civil Engineering at UNM in the fall of 2018.  My research is currently focused on characterizing the Rio Chama watershed in terms of climate change resilience, including describing the hydrology, climate, ecosystem, and human system in terms of their relationship to water and adaptations to changing climate.  I have a strong interest in interdisciplinary methods and science-practice integration.

Adrian Marziliano

Master’s student, Research Assistant

Email: amarziliano@unm.edu

Phone number: 559-463-6508

Personal Website

I moved to Albuquerque, NM in January 2018 to pursue a Master of Water Resources Management degree. I was born in Toronto, Canada and grew up in the San Joaquin Valley of California. I have spent an equal amount of time in both the U.S. and Canada, and have also lived in Santiago, Chile for two years. I completed a Bachelor of Commerce degree at Ryerson University in Toronto with a specialization in finance and human resource minor. I became interested in water first as a commodity and then, after some research on water-related stock funds, I decided to pursue water management as full-time career. My interests include snowpack, direct-potable reuse technologies, water compact law and water markets. I am currently studying snow variability in the moderate snowpack areas of the Sandia and Jemez mountains.

Aljaz Praznik

Master’s Student

Email: apraznik@unm.edu

Phone Number: 505 277-5423

I grew up under the Alps in Slovenia, where I spent most of my time outdoors. This is where I developed an interest in nature and the environment. I was a professional cross-country skier in Slovenia and a college athlete and a coach in New Mexico. I completed my undergraduate degree at University of New Mexico in Environmental Science and am now doing a Graduate degree in Civil Engineering-Water Resources. I am interested in glaciers and alpine environments as well as rivers and wildfires. My current research involves Wildfires in New Mexico and its effect on water streams.

Alissa Nicole Perea

Undergrad and master’s student

Email: anperea@unm.edu

Phone number: 505 277-2722

I was born and raised in Albuquerque, New Mexico. I am a Junior in the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering and enrolled in the Shared Credit Program. Currently, my research is focusing on attempting to test the applicability of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) for predicting changes in ground water levels as a response to changes in streamflow. In my free time, I like to spend time with friends, travel to new and exciting places, or read a good book.

 Rob Salazar

Master’s Student

Email: salazar.rg@gmail.com

As a native of Albuquerque, New Mexico, I am connected to the desert southwest and the many communities that call this place home. After thirteen years working in public education, I returned to my original field of engineering. My studies focus on how communities in our region can prepare for the long-term impacts of climate change

Cassy Scarlott- McClintock

Graduate student and research assistant.

Email: clscarlott@unm.edu
Phone Number: 505 277-2722

Hello everyone! My name is Cassy Scarlott- McClintock, I was born here in Albuquerque, New Mexico. I received my bachelor’s in Civil Engineering, with honors, at the University of New Mexico in May 2018. Continuing my education at UNM, I am currently in partial fulfilment of my Masters of Science in Water Resources Engineering, planning to graduate in May 2020. My masters program is in partnership with Dr. Mark Stone at UNM and AMAFCA, the Albuquerque Metropolitan Arroyo Flood Control Authority, where I work as the Engineering Intern.

Gerhard Schoener

P.HD. student

Email: gschoener@sscafca.com

For over a decade, I have been working as the hydrologist for the Southern Sandoval County Arroyo Flood Control Authority. My main interest lies in dryland watersheds and how they are affected by the people that inhabit them. After studying Forestry in Germany, I decided to focus on water when I moved to arid New Mexico in 2005. I’m currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Water Resources Engineering.

Niloo Shams Abadi

Undergrad Student and Lab Assistant

Email: Nilooshams@unm.edu

My full name is Seyedeh Niloofar Shams Abadi. I moved to Albuquerque, NM in 2017, from Tehran, Iran. I am currently a sophomore in Civil Engineering Department. I joined the Resilience team at the beginning of my sophomore year as a lab assistant. I am trying to expand my knowledge to make the best choice for my field of interest for graduate studies. I enjoy outdoor activities and learning about different languages.

Betsy Summers

Email: shaferbetsy@gmail.com

My research focuses on ecosystem metabolism along an aridland river and a snowmelt driven headwater stream. I use high-resolution time-series data collected by in situ sensors to explore spatial and temporal variability of metabolism and responses to physicochemical conditions. In addition to my interest in flowing waters, I have a wealth of field experience in lake and wetland systems along the coast of Michigan, my native state. My background in Biology (B.S., GVSU, MI) and Water Resources (Masters, UNM, NM) provides me with an interdisciplinary ecohydrology perspective in my PhD research.